Clean

Psalm 51:1-2 “To the chief Musician, A Psalm of David, when Nathan the prophet came unto him, after he had gone in to Bath-sheba. Have mercy upon me, O God, according to thy lovingkindness: according unto the multitude of thy tender mercies blot out my transgressions. Wash me throughly from mine iniquity, and cleanse me from my sin.”

You are only as clean as you desire to be.

A clean body is a seemingly simple and easy task for most folks.

Clean of mind is a challenge in today’s technological society.

Clean of soul and spirit is a vigilant and purposeful act that must be taken up daily.

The level of cleanliness that we accept for our lives is an accurate gauge for our love for God. A heart free from offense will submit and obey. A heart desirous of fellowship with the Almighty will do whatever it takes to be and to stay clean.

David knew what it was to have a close, personal fellowship with the Lord.

His songs spoke intimately of the love he knew God had for him and the love he had for his God. David made it very clear that he cried tears. Tears of joy. Tears of sorrow. Tears of a deep desire for a prayer request yet unanswered.

When was the last time we wept? For what did we weep? Was it for a wound sustained at the hand of another? Was it for a selfish desire unfulfilled?

We are privy to David’s life; chronicled for us in great detail. We learned of his humble beginnings. We see his rise to power by the providence of Almighty God. We then see, later in life, a misstep; sin that began with a small compromise.

He stayed home from battle when it was a time for kings to go to war.

2 Samuel 11:1 And it came to pass, after the year was expired, at the time when kings go forth to battle, that David sent Joab, and his servants with him, and all Israel; and they destroyed the children of Ammon, and besieged Rabbah. But David tarried still at Jerusalem.”

It is often when we are not doing what we are meant to do; what we are supposed to do that we open the door to sin we wouldn’t normally take up. Idleness and laziness are sure tools of our enemy to affect our minds for evil.

His walk on the roof in the evening was the opportunity Satan needed to parade a naked woman before the king. David called after her and slept with Bathsheba. His one-night stand begat fruit of a child. Her pregnancy was made known, and David sought to cover it up.

David’s efforts to cover up this whole mess leaves him with Uriah’s blood on his hands, a baby in peril and a dirty heart. The Bible tells us it was anywhere from twelve to eighteen months between the time he sinned and Nathan’s confrontation before his writing the 51st Psalm.

To live with the guilt and shame; knowing that God so disapproved of his actions, must have been horrible. The sincere repentance we read of in this Psalm reveals David’s love for cleanliness in his relationship with his God.

Does our sin cause us to weep over the fact that there is a great divide in the closeness and intimacy we once shared with the Father?

Have we become so numb to the love we say we hold dear? Are we accepting of sin’s division and the impending destruction of a relationship purchased with the blood of the Lord Jesus Christ?

Can we stack the blessing, provision, protection, power, mercy, grace, and forgiveness we have received from God against the pleasure of the sin we hold dear?

That feeling of clean we get when we take the time to wash appropriately gives us a sense of peace and calm.

Taking the time to cleanse our soul before God yields a calm and a peace unmatched by anything soap and water can do. We often wonder why we have trouble in our life. Have we taken the time to ask God if He is trying to get out attention, and do we pay attention to the cleanliness of our soul?

Proverbs 4:23 Keep thy heart with all diligence; for out of it are the issues of life.”

God tells us to keep our heart. Watch it. Cleanse it as needed. Early and often. For then, it will yield the peaceable fruit of righteousness God desires to see in our lives.

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